Symposium: 'Law, Technology, and the Organization of Work'

Friday, March 2, 2018 -
9:00am to 4:00pm

John K. Pruellage Courtroom

Registration Begins at 8 a.m.
5.9 MO CLE Credits Available

This Symposium is sponsored by the Wefel Center for Employment Law and the Law Journal.

As technology creates change in our lives, it is now ever-more important to think about the ways in which we work, how we think about work, and how work will be regulated.

Including crowdwork, on-demand platforms, people analytics, big data, 3-D printing, and other technologies, these new modalities of digitalisation challenge both our ethics and our currently existing regulatory structures for labor. These issues are increasingly global, as many of these technologies are not restricted by national boundaries.

This symposium will endeavor to think forward on the changes these technologies will engender and the ways in which firms and workers are structuring their new working relationships.

Speakers

Valerio De Stefano
BOFZAP Research Professor of Labour Law, KU Leuven, Belgium

Valerio De Stefano is the BOF-ZAP Research Professor of Labour Law at KU Leuven, Belgium, where he does research on non-standard employment, work in the "platform" (gig) economy, technology and fundamental labour rights. He obtained his Ph.D. (2007-11) at Bocconi, where, after his doctorate, he received a postdoctoral fellowship for four years (2011-14). He was a post-doctoral member at Clare Hall College at the University of Cambridge (2013) and a visiting academic at the University College of London (2012) and until 2014, he was an associate of Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer LLP in Milan. From 2014 to 2017, he worked as an officer of the International Labour Office (ILO) in Geneva. His main research interests are international and comparative labour law and labour protection of non-standard and contingent workers.

Winifred R. Poster
International Affairs, Washington University, St. Louis

Winifred R. Poster is a sociologist with a Ph.D. from Stanford University. She teaches in international affairs at Washington University, St. Louis, with visiting positions at universities in India, Sweden, Germany and Canada. Her interests are in digital globalization, feminist labor theory, and Indian outsourcing. Under several grants from the National Science Foundation, she has been following information and communication technology jobs from the U.S. to India, both in earlier waves of computer manufacturing and software, and later waves of back-office data processing and call centers. Current projects explore the labors of surveillance, crowdsourcing, cybersecurity, automation and artificial intelligence. Her latest books are Invisible Labor with Marion Crain and Miriam Cherry (UC Press), and Borders in Service with Kiran Mirchandani (University of Toronto Press).

Deepa Das Acevedo
Sharswood Fellow, University of Pennsylvania Law School

Deepa Das Acevedo is a Sharswood Fellow at the University of Pennsylvania Law School. She studies employment regulation and new work models with a focus on the sharing economy. Her scholarship blends doctrinal analysis with ethnographic fieldwork among workers, worker-advocates, and policy-makers, and has been published or is forthcoming in Southern California Law Review, Employee Rights & Employment Policy Journal, Notre Dame Law Review Online, and The University of Chicago Legal Forum. Her proposal for a new “Shadow 401(k)” system of portable employee benefits won the 2016 essay prize from the American College of Employee Benefits Counsel. Deepa received her A.B. from Princeton University, her J.D. from The University of Chicago, and her M.A. and Ph.D. in anthropology, also from The University of Chicago.

Leticia Saucedo
Professor of Law, University of California, Davis School of Law

Leticia Saucedo is a professor of law at University of California, Davis School of Law. She is an expert in employment, labor, and immigration law and has developed courses in international and domestic service learning that explore the immigration consequences of crime and domestic violence in a post-conflict society.

    

     

Cynthia Estlund
Catherine A. Rein Professor, New York University School of Law

Cynthia Estlund is the Catherine A. Rein Professor at New York University School of Law. She has written three books and many articles on various dimensions of labor and employment law and workplace governance.

     

         

         

                    
Charlotte Garden
Co-Associate Dean for Research and Faculty Development and Associate Professor at Seattle University School of Law

Charlotte Garden is a co-associate dean for Research and Faculty Development and an associate professor at Seattle University School of Law. She is also the litigation director of the school’s Korematsu Center for Law & Equality. Her research focuses on the intersection of work law and constitutional law.

      

              

                      

Ifeoma Ajunwa
Assistant Professor, Industrial and Labor Relations School of Cornell University; Faculty Associate Member, Cornell Law School

Ifeoma Ajunwa is an assistant professor in the Organizational Behavior Department of Cornell’s Industrial and Labor Relations School and a faculty associate member at Cornell Law School. Professor Ajunwa has taught at several law schools; immediately prior to her position at Cornell ILR School, she was a Fellow at the Berkman Klein Center at Harvard University (where she remains a Faculty Associate) and served as a Teaching Fellow at Harvard Law School. Professor Ajunwa’s research has been published or accepted for publication in top law review journals including the California Law Review, the Harvard Civil Rights-Civil Liberties Law Review, the Northwestern Law Review, the Fordham Law Review, etc. She has presented her work before governmental agencies such as the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (the CFPB) and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (the EEOC).

Pauline Kim
Daniel Noyes Kirby Professor of Law at Washington University School of Law

Pauline Kim is the Daniel Noyes Kirby Professor of Law at Washington University School of Law in St. Louis, where she teaches courses on employment law, employment discrimination, civil procedure and pretrial processes. She is a nationally recognized expert on the law of the workplace, and has written widely on issues such as employee privacy, employment discrimination, and the use of big data in the workplace.

        

      

Miriam Cherry
Co-Director of the William C. Wefel Center for Employment Law and Professor at Saint Louis University School of Law

Miriam A. Cherry is a professor of law and co-director of the William C. Wefel Center for Employment Law at Saint Louis University. Professor Cherry is a graduate of Dartmouth College and Harvard Law School. She clerked for Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts and the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit. In 2008, she was elected a member of the American Law Institute. She is the author of more than 30 law review articles, including a 2009 path-breaking article on minimum wage for virtual workers. Recent work has focused on people analytics, age discrimination claims by older workers in the on-demand economy, and invisible labor that is hidden by platforms.

Brishen Rogers
Associate Professor of Law at Temple University Beasley School of Law

Brishen Rogers is an associate professor of law at Temple University. His research focuses on labor/employment law and law and economic inequality. He is currently under contract with MIT Press for a monograph titled The Law and Political Economy of Workplace Information. He will present selections from that work at the colloquium. 

        

      

       

Schedule

8 – 9 a.m. // CLE Registration
9 – 9:05 a.m. // Introduction

Marcia McCormick, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Professor of Law, Saint Louis University School of Law

9:05 – 10:45 a.m. // Session #1
  • "How Technology Will Advance or Inhibit Labor Organizing"
    Charlotte Garden, Co-Associate Dean for Research and Faculty Development and Associate Professor, Seattle University School of Law

  • "Data Deficits in Municipal Rideshare Programs"
    Deepa Das Acevedo, Sharswood Fellow, University of Pennsylvania Law School

  • "The Law and Political Economy of Workplace Information"
    Brishen Rogers, Associate Professor of Law, Temple University Beasley School of Law

  • "A New Research Agenda for Employment Law Scholarship - Technology in the Workplace"
    Ifeoma Ajunwa, Assistant Professor, Industrial and Labor Relations School of Cornell University; Faculty Associate Member, Cornell Law School
10:45 – 11 a.m. // Break 
11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. // Session #2
  • "Platform and Digitalised Work: Debunking Myths and Protecting Workers"
    Valerio De Stefano, BOF-ZAP Research Professor of Labour Law, KU Leuven, Belgium

  • "What Should We Do After Work? Automation, Job Loss, and the Law of Work"
    Cynthia Estlund, Catherine A. Rein Professor, New York University School of Law

  • "Who's Tracking Whom? Multi-Surveillance of Labor in the Online Sex Trafficking Industry"
    Winifred Poster, International Affairs, Washington University in St. Louis
12:30 – 2 p.m. // Break
– 3:30 p.m. // Session #3
  • "Crowdwashing: Corporate Social Responsibility, Technology, and Labor Practices"
    Miriam Cherry, Co-Director of the William C. Wefel Center for Employment Law and Professor of Law, Saint Louis University School of Law

  • "Discrimination in Online Recruiting Strategies"
    Pauline Kim, Daniel Noyes Kirby Professor of Law, Washington University School of Law

  • "The Independent Contract and Autonomy in the Gig Economy"
    Leticia Saucedo, Professor of Law at University of California, Davis School of Law
3:30 – 3:45 p.m. // Closing Remarks

Miriam Cherry, Co-Director of the William C. Wefel Center for Employment Law and Professor of Law, Saint Louis University School of Law

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Keegan Shea

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