Friday, January 30, 2015 -
9:00am to 1:00pm

John K. Pruellage Courtroom

Perspectives on Fighting Human Trafficking

presented by the Center for International and Comparative Law and the Saint Louis University Law Journal


Human trafficking has been called “the modern day slavery.” Trafficking victims are forced to have sex or to work long hours against their will, often in dangerous situations and facing threats of violence or deportation. Many times the victims of trafficking do not see themselves as victims or are afraid to speak out, fearing that they themselves might be prosecuted. The 2015 Saint Louis University Law Journal symposium, co-sponsored by the Center for International and Comparative Law, focused on the role of the victim in combating human trafficking. Two panels focused on finding and working with victims in prosecuting trafficking, and two major talks highlighted global trends in human trafficking. 


Speakers

budke.pngChristopher A. Budke

Special Investigator, Husch Blackwell

A former FBI special agent for more than 30 years, Chris is an honored and respected investigative agent across the country. In addition to his investigative skills, Chris has passed all parts of the Certified Public Accounting (CPA) examination. His broad base of experience includes complicated multi-national, national and regional criminal investigations with an emphasis in civil rights, white-collar and financial crime, public corruption, health care fraud, organized crime, money laundering, and criminal enterprise investigations.

As a Supervisory Special Agent, Chris directly managed the Kansas City Division’s Civil Rights Program. In that position, Chris supervised the FBI Special Agents and investigations of the Human Trafficking Rescue Project Task Force, a U.S. Department of Justice sponsored Anti-Trafficking Coordination Team covering both Kansas and Missouri. This task force conducted long-term investigations utilizing sophisticated investigative techniques to identify, disrupt and dismantle human trafficking organizations and was responsible for rescuing more than 150 trafficking victims.


Elizabeth Campbell

Clinical Assistant Professor of Law, Human Trafficking Clinic, University of Michigan Law School

Professor Elizabeth Campbell is a clinical assistant professor of law in the Human Trafficking Clinic. Her research and teaching interests focus on human trafficking, immigration, domestic violence and criminal law, and she is a member of the Michigan Human Trafficking Taskforce. She is spearheading a pilot project in partnership with Washtenaw County aimed at better responding to victims of human trafficking that are arrested and/or charged with prostitution and related offenses. Based primarily on Campbell’s efforts, the Human Trafficking Clinic was awarded a $500,000 grant from the Department of Justice in order to better understand the overlap of human trafficking, domestic violence and sexual assault. Campbell recently co-authored a book entitled “Immigration Relief: Legal Assistance for Noncitizen Crime Victims. She received her B.A., with distinction, from the University of Michigan and earned her J.D., cum laude, from Michigan Law. During law school, she was a Michigan refugee and asylum law fellow with the Refugee Status Appeals Authority in New Zealand and a project coordinator for Family Law Project, a division of Legal Services of South Central Michigan.


Eric Ha

General Counsel, International Justice Mission

International Justice Mission (“IJM”) is a global human rights organization that works to protect the poor in the developing world from forced labor slavery, human trafficking, sexual assault, commercial sexual exploitation, and other forms of everyday violence. As general counsel, Ha is responsible for overseeing all of IJM’s domestic and international legal affairs.

Prior to joining IJM, Ha spent nine years at Sidley Austin LLP in Chicago, where his practice focused on complex commercial and regulatory litigation, regulatory counseling, white collar criminal defense, and internal investigations. He also taught constitutional law at the University of Miami School of Law and served as a law clerk to United States District Judge Jorge A. Solis.

Eric earned a B.A. with honors from the University of Texas at Austin and a J.D. from the University of Chicago Law School, where he was a Public Interest Law Initiative Fellow. He lives in the Washington, D.C. area with his wife and three children.


Miguel Keberlein

Director, Immigrants and Workers’ Rights Practice Group

Miguel Keberlein Gutiérrez is the Director of the Immigrants and Workers’ Rights Practice Group at LAF Chicago. He is also an Adjunct Professor of Law at Northern Illinois University College of Law. He has been litigating cases on behalf of migrant and seasonal agricultural workers for over a decade.

Keberlein was named a 2014 Emerging Leader Fellow by the Chicago Community Trust. He was also chosen as one of the 40 under Forty Attorneys to Watch in Illinois for 2010. He was also the 2007 Kimball and Karen Gatsis Anderson Public Interest Law Fellowship Award recipient, given out to one outstanding public interest lawyer each year. Keberlein received his J.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2002. He was a graduate fellow at the University of Iowa where he earned a M.A. in Third World Development. Keberlein has been featured in the Chicago Lawyer magazine for his statewide work. He has done numerous presentations at both state and national trainings and serves on several community organization boards throughout Illinois. He is also very active with community development projects in Guatemala where he has led projects building schools, bridges, and potable water systems in rural indigenous communities.


Mary Leary

Professor, Catholic University, Columbus School of Law

Professor Mary Leary is a former state and federal prosecutor and attorney in the non-profit sector. Her work on both the trial and appellate level prior to academia focused primarily on issues addressing the exploitation of and violence against children and women. She is a former assistant U.S. attorney and served as deputy chief of the Domestic Violence Unit for the Middlesex County District Attorney's Office in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Leary also served as an assistant district attorney in the Family Violence and Sexual Assault Unit of the Philadelphia District Attorney's Office. She was previously the director of the National Center for Prosecution of Child Abuse. Leary clerked for the Hon. Sue L. Robinson in the U.S. District Court for the District of Delaware.

Her scholarship examines the intersection of contemporary social problems, technology, criminal law and criminal procedure. She focuses on areas of exploitation and abuse of women, children and “vulnerable peoples,” with particular attention to human trafficking. She is a previous recipient of the Award for Teaching Excellence in Early Career from The Catholic University of America, Teacher of the Year from the Columbus School of Law, Mary, Mirror of Justice Award and has been named Faculty Marshal by four of the last five graduating classes.

She received her B.A. with honors from Georgetown University and earned her J.D. from the Georgetown University Law Center.


Alexandra Levy

Attorney, Human Trafficking Pro Bono Legal Center

Alexandra Levy is an attorney at the Human Trafficking Pro Bono Legal Center and an adjunct professor at Notre Dame Law School, where she created and teaches the law school's first course on human trafficking. Levy's curriculum and scholarship focus on human trafficking from a Law and Economics perspective. She regularly speaks on issues relating to criminality, victimhood, and the economics of black markets. Levy has contributed to widely-used resources on civil human trafficking litigation, and provides assistance to pro bono attorneys handling trafficking matters at law firms nationwide. A graduate of the University of Chicago Law School, Levy also teaches Introduction to the American Legal System in Notre Dame's LL.M. program for foreign attorneys.


John Richmond

Special Litigation Counsel with the U.S. Department of Justice’s Human Trafficking Prosecution Unit

John Richmond is currently special litigation counsel with the U.S. Department of Justice’s Human Trafficking Prosecution Unit. He has investigated and prosecuted numerous victim centered labor and sex trafficking cases throughout the United States. He has served as an expert on human trafficking for the United Nation’s Working Group on Trafficking in Persons and at the European Union’s multilateral meetings on human trafficking. He has trained judges, prosecutors, federal agents, law enforcement officers, non-governmental organizations, and international delegations on human trafficking investigative and prosecutorial strategies. Prior to joining the Department of Justice, Richmond worked on human trafficking crimes as the director of the International Justice Mission’s slavery work in India.


Derek Stigerts

FBI, Innocence Lost Task Force

Detective Derek Stigerts has been a police officer since 1991 and detective since 2005 with the Sacramento Police Department. In 2006, he became a full time member of the Sacramento FBI Division’s Child Exploitation Innocence Lost Task Force. The task force combines Special Agents of the FBI and local law enforcement detectives in combating commercial sexual exploitation of children and prosecuting those responsible for their exploitation. Stigerts is an instructor at the FBI’s Child/Adolescent Forensic Interviewing Course and has presented and instructed at many federal and state trainings regarding the commercial sexual exploitation of children. He has testified as an expert in federal court in several districts across the country as well as state court in California and Arizona regarding sex trafficking of children and adults.


Monica Stump

AUSA, Southern District of Illinois

Since June 2012, Monica Stump has worked as an assistant U.S. attorney in the Criminal Division of the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of Illinois. She serves as the human trafficking coordinator in her office. Prior to June, she worked as an assistant United States Attorney in the Middle District of Alabama, where she primarily prosecuted immigration and human trafficking offenses. She also co-founded the Human Trafficking Coalition for the Middle District of Alabama. Since 2009, she has participated in over three dozen human trafficking training sessions across the States of Alabama and Illinois.

Prior to joining the U.S. Attorney’s Office, Stump served as a law clerk to two federal judges and as an attorney in the Office of General Counsel at the U.S. International Trade Commission in Washington, D.C. She also taught Criminal Procedure as an adjunct professor of law in 2008 at Faulkner University’s Thomas Goode School of Law.

Stump received her J.D., magna cum laude, from the University of Pittsburgh School of Law School in 2002. She holds a B.A., magna cum laude, in Political Science and Interdisciplinary Studies from the University of Pittsburgh. She is admitted to the bar in Pennsylvania and Washington, D.C.


 

Event Schedule

Time
Session

8:30 a.m.
REGISTRATION

 
9 - 10 a.m.
OPENING KEYNOTE: TRENDS IN HUMAN TRAFFICKING
 
John Richmond
Special Litigation Counsel with the U.S. Department of Justice's Human Trafficking Prosecution Unit

 
10 - 10:50 a.m.
PANEL 1: WORKING WITH, AND HELPING, THE VICTIMS OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING
 

Alexandra Levy
Attorney, Human Trafficking Pro Bono Legal Center

Derek Stigerts
FBI, Innocence Lost Task Force

Monica Stump
AUSA, Southern District of Illinois


 
11 - 11:50 a.m.
PANEL 2: PERSPECTIVES ON HUMAN TRAFFICKING
 

Christopher A. Budke
Special Investigator, Husch Blackwell

Eric Ha
General Counsel, International Justice Mission

Miguel Keberlein
Director, Immigrants and Workers' Rights Practice Group

Elizabeth Campbell
Clinical Assistant Professor of Law, Human Trafficking Clinic, University of Michigan Law School


 
12:10 - 1 p.m.
LUNCH KEYNOTE: HUMAN TRAFFICKING AS MODERN DAY SLAVERY - IMPLICATIONS OF A LABEL
 
Mary Leary
Professor, Catholic University, Columbus School of Law

 

Contact Name

Ira Trako

Registration

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Last Day to Drop Without a W Sep 2 2018 (All day)
 
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